Newswire: July 26, 2016 — What Sal Khan Would Tell The Next President About Innovation — Time To Put Aside Politics For Our Kids — Michael Moe on EdTech, Innovation and Opportunity — KIPP Summit

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INNOVATION & THE NEXT POTUS. This week, it’s the Dems turn to hear what our next president needs to know about education opportunity and innovation from leading experts like Sal Khan and more. Join the chorus of tweets by clicking here.

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2016 ED-LECTION CENTER. Your resource for everything you need to know about where candidates stand when it comes to education opportunity. Bookmark this link for news & views, important resources, and candidate profiles and party platforms (coming soon!). 

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REFORMING WITH THE ENEMY.  “Advocates for true education reform must be willing to pass judgment on policy positions before condemning policy proponents,” CER Founder & CEO Jeanne Allen opines in The 74. Why it’s time to drop ideological swords to make schools work better for kids.

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THE POWER OF TECH & INNOVATION.  Co-Founder of Global Silicon Valley Partners and CER board member Michael Moe reiterates themes of A New Opportunity Agenda on Getting Smart’s podcast. Listen here for insight on how ed-tech and innovation can boost access and opportunity in education. (And then check out 4 Things Every Ed Tech Investor Needs to Know!)

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KIPP SUMMIT.  Dave Levin, co-founder of the widely known charter school network KIPP, opens the annual summit in Atlanta this year noting that in the last 22 years, KIPP has helped thousands build a better tomorrow, but that we must do more to ensure an equitable society. Follow the summit on twitter at #KIPP2016, and sign here if you agree we must create a new opportunity agenda in education.

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EDU OPPORTUNITY LIVE FROM INDY.  Don’t miss the CER-Kemp Forum on Expanding Opportunity, streaming live from the NCAA Hall of Champions with a few education champions of our own, including Sen. Tim Scott, Gov. Mike Pence, Sen. Leah Vukmir, and more. Tune in here at 6:45pm EST Wednesday, July 27 for critical conversations on addressing upward mobility & poverty through education.

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Reforming with the Enemy: Putting Our Kids Ahead of Politics

by Jeanne Allen
The 74
July 20, 2016

Donald Trump’s attacks on Hillary Clinton were returned recently at the annual meeting of the American Federation of Teachers, the nation’s second-largest union, and the one representing most of the urban teachers in this country.

“Mike Pence is one of the most extreme vice presidential picks in a generation,” Clinton said. “And he’s one of the most hostile politicians in America when it comes to public education. Neither Mike Pence nor Donald Trump should be anywhere near our children’s education.”

Those words were the equivalent of throwing red meat to the wolves, as the union crowd erupted into cheers, hoots, and hollers.

Similarly, education reformers — activists, donors, lawmakers — are taking sides and reacting across social media, each about their respective outrages.

I understand how it is to feel adamant about a candidate. I have tweeted my way through a political season. But advocates for true education reform must be willing to pass judgment on policy positions before condemning policy proponents.

Such unity hardly seems possible when Clinton’s union supporters are feeding anti-school choice talking points to legions of members that their schools will disappear under a Trump-Pence administration. And Trump supporters organized in the blogosphere use different calling cards to strike a similar fear in parents, focusing on the impact a Clinton administration would have on the hearts and minds of their children, with the loss of local control and teachers unions in charge of the U.S. Department of Education.

Finding any middle path or “common” ground will be hard. And for many ed reformers, the pair of candidates presents a Hobson’s choice.

But it need not be so.Screen Shot 2016-07-20 at 5.39.04 PM

We have, as the saying goes, no permanent allies nor permanent enemies, just a never-ending interest in bettering education. Those who care passionately about education should be willing to work with anyone who is equally as passionate.

It doesn’t mean they will get your vote. But we need their ear now, and we need an open door with whoever wins. We must be willing to recognize any candidate that supports the core policies and principles of education innovation and opportunity, or call them out for their opposition, no matter who they are or what they espouse on other issues that may be near and dear to our hearts.

Why? Because history shows us that this is how we succeed.

The development of education reform is rich in strange bedfellows that locked arms in and outside of elections. People came together on policies that disrupted the status quo, recognizing that the most important issue facing our country is the education of our youth.

Wisconsin state Rep. Polly Williams was a member of the Black Panthers. She was also a partner with Conservative Republican Gov. Tommy Thompson to make vouchers a reality for poor children in Milwaukee and pave the way for greater school improvement throughout Wisconsin.

The fact that Democrats once called Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge every name in the book didn’t stop state Rep. Dwight Evans, an African-American Philadelphian who is now in line to enter Congress, from uniting with Ridge to create the state’s charter school law. Republicans fought against it to preserve local control, and Democrats fought against it to preserve the current system’s power. Sound familiar?

And in Cleveland, where the Republican Party is current perched, the late great City Councilwoman Fannie Lewis told everyone that she didn’t care who she worked with so long as they could help save her babies in her city. She joined hands with George Voinovich, a Republican governor, and free market, conservative donors to fight for school choice. And fight they did, all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

At least a dozen other such alliances have had transformational results in education in cities and states nationwide. Florida’s scholarship programs enjoy majority support in the black and Latino caucuses, even among Democrats. They partner with Republican Gov. Rick Scott, their arch-nemesis, on other issues.

Polar opposites and divisions in reform have always existed, but for years, politicians were willing to look beyond the most extreme of differences, because reformers did too.

Truly committed to education opportunity?

On the same page in support of policies and practices that produce the innovation, flexibility, and transparency to create those opportunities that hold the key to better schools for all children?

Then let’s put down our ideological swords, roll up our sleeves, and make it happen.

Let’s go back to the future. Lawmakers in statehouses nationwide and in Congress would welcome it. Policymakers and think tank researchers want it.

And our kids deserve it.

Politico: Where Tim Kaine Stands on Education Issues

POLITICO Morning Education
July 25, 2016

WHERE TIM KAINE STANDS ON EDUCATION ISSUES: Hillary Clinton’s vice presidential pick has been active in Congress on education issues, particularly when it comes to career and technical education. He’s been pushing to expand federal student loans for some career education programs, has worked on a rewrite of the Perkins Act, and founded and co-chairs the Senate career and technical education caucus.

On LGBT students’ rights: In early May, Kaine wrote a letter [http://bit.ly/2am2DJL] to Education Secretary John B. King Jr. urging him to issue a clarification that LGBT students are fully protected from discrimination under Title IX, which prohibits sex-based discrimination in federally funded education programs and activities. Less than two weeks later, the Education Department issued guidance [http://politico.pro/2am2VjL] that transgender students must be permitted to use bathrooms that align with their gender identity – which has prompted about half of states to sue over the issue.

On free public higher education: “We need to give careful consideration, particularly on the fiscal front, to whether there should be some type of income test with respect to free access to college,” Kaine wrote in a Q&A published in The Huffington Post earlier this year [http://huff.to/2aouS99]. “By making all public university education free, we’d be giving away college education to richer Americans who don’t need the assistance paying for it.”

As governor of Virginia, Kaine also signed the state up to support [http://bit.ly/2am4o7W] the development of the Common Core. But the state ultimately rejected the academic standards in math and English in favor of its own standards, which state officials deemed more rigorous.

– Reflections on Virginia Tech shooting: Speaking Saturday at his first Clinton campaign rally as her VP pick, Kaine invoked his experience leading Virginia after 32 people were shot to death at Virginia Tech in 2007. He described it as the “worst day of my life.” Kaine subsequently signed into law a series of bills to address emergency responses on college campuses and mental health issues [http://bit.ly/2aovk73].

– His wife, Anne Holton, is a political power player in her own right – she’s the education secretary of Virginia; she also spent seven years on the judicial bench and, as a teen, helped integrate schools in Richmond, Va., when her father was governor. Kimberly Hefling has more: http://politico.pro/2a68cZg.

AFT Applauds Sen. Kaine Selection as Clinton’s Running Mate

The following was released by the American Federation of Teachers Friday, July 22 after Hillary Clinton selected Sen. Tim Kaine as her running mate:

Statement by American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten on presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton’s selection of Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) as her vice presidential running mate:

“The choice of Tim Kaine, the son of a welder who has lived middle-class values and has a long track record of progressive accomplishments, reiterates Hillary Clinton’s commitment to building a government that will level the playing field for working families. While the GOP ticket masks irrational ideas behind a morally bankrupt message of fear, bigotry and hatred, a Clinton-Kaine ticket will be focused on helping people see higher wages, lower student debt, good jobs, successful public schools, and safety and security here and abroad.

“The contrasts between a Clinton-Kaine ticket and a Trump-Pence ticket couldn’t be more stark. Donald Trump, the narcissist, believes that he alone can fix our nation’s problems and peddles fear in a campaign devoid of facts, plans or humanity. Clinton and Kaine choose to confront fear and solve problems, and they will use their vast experience to help ensure the American dream is within reach for everyone.

“Strong public education runs deep in the Kaine household. In the U.S. Senate, he took the lead on supporting career and technical education programs in the new federal education law, and he has fought for funding to modernize public school buildings. And as Virginia’s governor, he expanded pre-K programs by 40 percent. His wife, Anne Holton, has been dedicated to fighting for great public schools for decades—she helped integrate Richmond, Va., public schools as a child and today is Virginia’s secretary of education.

“Our nation and the world can feel confident that the Clinton-Kaine ticket will be a great leadership team that will work to break down walls, disarm hate, and make educational and economic opportunity a reality.”

The Stakes Couldn’t Be Higher: It’s Time to Let Education Innovation and Opportunity Thrive

by Jeanne Allen
Yorktown Crier & Poquoson Post
July 21, 2016

Imagine a bi-partisan commission focused on one of America’s most pressing national issues. Imagine a consensus opinion on what needs to be done to save generations of American youth-at-risk.

Now imagine ignoring those recommendations.

Unthinkable to some, but the sad reality we see today.

Some 40 years ago, A Nation at Risk called the American public to arms, impressing on them the urgent need to refocus on a robust education for our nation’s youth. Nearly half a century later, we have forgotten this report’s impactful message. We forget it produced a generational commitment to education reform that endured.

Our commitment is shaken, and in danger of collapsing at the very moment a nationwide commitment to real, lasting education reform is so needed.

Education reforms enacted over the past few decades have been the driving force for better outcomes for millions of kids. Public, and private, school choice, as well as charter schools and other innovations created real opportunity, literally lifting children from poverty.

But scores on the Nation’s Report Card are a glaring reminder of how far we still need to go. Just 37 percent of all 12th graders are making the grade in reading and 25 percent in math. The achievement gaps are sadly growing among minority kids.

You might look around and see so many school choice and charter options and ask where’s the evidence of innovative education opportunities slowing down?

Consider Washington, DC, where education reform efforts are central to the District’s rebound, transforming its business, residential, and even tourist climate. Even there, charters are – illegally – underfunded compared to traditional schools and they have still met with such success.

Ohio, on the other hand, sees regulations – many of which have nothing to do with education at all – falsely imposed in the name of accountability that are creating obstacles for schools.

Charters should be required to demonstrate fiscal accountability and educational success. But so should traditional public schools, and private ones.

Charters were started under the notion of freedom from broken, bureaucratic rules in exchange for accountability to get to the end goal of radically improving children’s lives. Now, as states re-impose so many unrelated regulations on charter schools they are dangerously close to causing them to become the very thing they sought to change.

There’s a path forward.

We can use the lessons of today’s Innovation Economy, where a teenager with a bright idea can both change the world and become a business titan. In every field – from medicine to finance – advances are made today by trying new things, and disrupting old systems.

Everywhere, except education. There, it’s the same old excuse “it can’t be done.”

We can’t innovate because the decisions about our children’s learning are still largely regulated by outdated, inflexible laws.

We need to radically rethink everything education.

Our children are growing up in an increasingly global, digital world. They hail taxis on their smartphone. They interface & communicate on screen, all day.

And yet they’re in classrooms facing a blackboard.

The greatest need in education today is for learning opportunities built to fit our digital Innovative Age.

For real progress, we need an environment that welcomes rather than rejects innovation.

Innovators need to be players in the game, instead of working at the sidelines tossing their products into the court and hoping someone – likely someone raised on a one-size-fits-all textbook – catches them and chooses to use them.

Improved educational outcomes require innovation and opportunity throughout the education landscape.

It is time to offer freedom to those who want to engage in real innovation – freedom from burdensome regulations, yes, but also freedom to disrupt and engage new models and modalities.

Let’s reinvigorate the basic principles that started a generation of education reform and charter schools.

That means defining accountability as learning, and finding wholly new and meaningful ways to measure actual progress.

We must carve opportunities to match each student’s own needs with the institutions or learning environments that might best serve them. To do all of this, we must ensure that money is available to fund students wherever they are, and that education policy focuses on allowing innovation, creating opportunity, and yielding results.

The Center for Education Reform is proudly at the forefront of education innovation, working to create the policy environment that allows for unique solutions to take root in any school and every community. We welcome the involvement of anyone who, like the Commission behind A Nation at Risk, can set aside other disagreements and focus on where we agree: that our kids are our most important national treasure, and we must provide a new opportunity agenda in education so that their future – and in turn our nation’s – is secure.

Jeanne Allen is founder and CEO of The Center for Education Reform in Washington, D.C. and author of The New Opportunity Agenda.

New York Times: Jeanne Allen on Gov. Mike Pence’s Record on Education

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July 21, 2016
New York Times
Letter to the Editor

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To the Editor:

Re “Pence’s Record on Education in Indiana Is One of Turmoil and Mixed Results” (news article, July 20):

In a toxic and unpredictable election cycle, Gov. Mike Pence’s record on education is exactly what we need: a reminder that education is the essential lever to expand opportunity for all Americans.

People on both the left and the right are taking issue with Mr. Pence’s record on education. But the reality is that he pushed forward advances in charter schools and vouchers, testing and preschool, all the while battling a state superintendent backed by the unions.

As a nonpartisan organization, the Center for Education Reform does not endorse candidates, but will always recognize and applaud those who advance sound education policies. Mr. Pence is a true pioneer of educational opportunity, with a record that shows he has what it takes to champion policies that move the needle on education opportunity for all.

JEANNE ALLEN

Founder and Chief Executive

The Center for Education Reform

Washington

Trump Jr. Passes Up Chance to Plagiarize Al Shanker

by Mike Antonucci
Intercepts
July 20, 2016

Education never figures big in presidential campaigns, but Donald Trump Jr. used it to fire a salvo during his speech at the Republican National Convention yesterday evening.

Our schools used to be an elevator to the middle class, now they’re stalled on the ground floor. They’re like Soviet-era department stores that are run for the benefit of the clerks and not the customers, for the teachers and the administrators and not the students.

The mention of the Soviets triggered a memory for me, so I dug through the ancient scrolls of education thought and came up with this stuff that Trump Jr. or any RNC speaker could have used without controversy.

It’s time to admit that public education operates like a planned economy, a bureaucratic system in which everybody’s role is spelled out in advance and there are few incentives for innovation and productivity. It’s no surprise that our school system doesn’t improve: It more resembles the communist economy than our own market economy.

…schools would have to be free to try new ideas. So management would be required to waive all regulations that might keep schools from considering any and all promising changes – except of course for rules dealing with health, safety and civil rights. And unions would have to grant staffs the right to waive provisions of union contracts that get in their way. School boards would also be required to give each participating school total control over its budget. Since lots of central regulating would be eliminated, the central budget would shrink – which means lots more money to turn over to schools. Finally, since the participating schools would vary a good deal in what they were doing, school boards would have to permit parental choice.

…School staff would be united as a team. They’d read and try new methods. They’d make painful decisions they now avoid. If their math staff were weak, they might offer a higher salary to attract new talent. They’d shape up their weaker colleagues. They’d reach out to the community, explore technology. They’d focus on student learning.

…We’ve been running our schools as planned economies for so long that the notion of using incentives to drive schools to change may strike some people as too radical – even though that’s the way we do it in every other sector of society. But no law of nature says public schools have to be run like state-owned factories or bureaucracies. If the Soviet Union can begin to accept the importance of incentives to productivity, it is time for people in public education to do the same.

That’s all from the July 23, 1989 “Where We Stand” advertorial published in the New York Times by Al Shanker, legendary president of the American Federation of Teachers. Shanker is no longer with us, which normally would bar his appearance on a convention stage, but he has the unique ability to speak to us from the Great Beyond. I wonder what he’d say?

From the EdReform Vault: July 2000

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Sixteen years ago, CER was paying close attention to the antics of the BLOB. Sadly, and at the expense of our kids, what’s old is new, as not much has changed…

An excerpt from CER’s July 2000 Monthly Letter to Friends:

A funny thing happened on the way to the forums… Union forums, that is. When both NEA and AFT convened to hash out their agendas and policies for the next year, there was more media skepticism than ever before about their role in improving America’s schools. The conventions were seen as self-serving, egocentric and overly political. The NEA voted to raise dues payments by five dollars. It will use these funds to stock its war chest to fight choice and charter efforts. The AFT resolved to “take back” the charter issue and reissued its set of conditions under which they will support charters, a box into which most of the nation’s 2000 charter schools would not fit.

Interestingly, both unions took up the issue of performance-based pay and NEA chose to have a formal dialogue. According to the report in the Teacher Quality Bulletin:

“The NEA passed a resolution affirming its opposition to performance-based pay at its convention. The resolution has sparked debate around the country, including criticism in several major newspapers. A Washington Post editorial described unions as ‘too often simply defending the status quo, even when that status quo means inferior education for too many children.’ A Chicago Tribune editorial began ‘Few professions reward workers merely for showing up. Many public schools do, though.’ In an op-ed, Chester E. Finn, Jr., president of the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, chided the union for claiming to stand for reform while in reality focussing only on the short-term interests of its members. Andrew Rotherham, of the Progressive Policy Institute, criticized the union for its reflexive opposition to new ideas.”

A catfight is in play among NEA rank and file over high stakes testing. Some of the same anti-testing fervor we profiled last month dominates the ranks of NEA delegates, who wanted the NEA this year to go on record opposing high stakes testing. One particular delegate writes on an anti-testing list-serve:

“I introduced new business item 63 at the representative assembly…which urged NEA to assist state affiliates in lobbying for a ban on high-stakes tests. [It was] referred to committee. What committee will this go to and what will happen to this new business item? What would have happened had it been approved? Resolution B55 details our philosophy about standardized tests as does line 47 under Legislative Concerns: NEA opposes reliance on a single test for determining a student’s future or as an indicator of school success. Bob Chase addressed this issue in his article ‘Tests and Sensibility ‘ in NEA Today last January. How have these words in Resolutions, Legislation, and from the President’s Corner been acted upon? NEA touts a commitment to advancing the cause of public education but has pandered to legislators and to corporate America on the issue of high-stakes testing. We have got to have the courage and the principles to publicly oppose these tests no matter the consequences. We are the largest and most powerful union in the nation. We must use this to our advantage to speak out for our students who have become pawns in a political game for over which they have no control. We, the true experts, cannot be a party to this testing travesty any longer.”

How, we wonder, does this union delegate explain the progress of 83 schools in the District of Columbia, who for the first time in recent memory increased test scores upon the heels of standards and testing hitting the District? More than a few DC school principals have cited the focus on tests as largely responsible.

Hands in the Cookie Jar. The IRS and Federal Election Commission (FEC) are investigating whether or not the NEA has violated the rules barring significant use of tax exempt funds for political purposes. After scrutinizing NEA documents Landmark Legal Foundation found that the same union that boasts an ability to oppose legislation and elect NEA-friendly legislators does not report any political expenditures on its federal tax return as required by the IRS. While NEA’s political arm is permitted political expenditures, NEA maintains that its general kitty of money is not used at all for political purposes. According to Landmark, this is despite the fact that the last several annual NEA budgets include line item expenditures for political action and the recruiting and election of candidates for school boards and other offices. “The issue is whether the NEA leadership in Washington is complying with federal tax laws and whether it is fully informing America’s teachers and the public about the enormous reach of its political activities,” said Landmark’s Mark Levin.

 

Read the entire July 2000 Letter to Friends here.

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Reforming with the enemy: Drop ideological swords to make schools better for kids

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by Jeanne Allen
The 74
July 20, 2016

Donald Trump’s attacks on Hillary Clinton were returned recently at the annual meeting of the American Federation of Teachers, the nation’s second-largest union, and the one representing most of the urban teachers in this country.

“Mike Pence is one of the most extreme vice presidential picks in a generation,” Clinton said. “And he’s one of the most hostile politicians in America when it comes to public education. Neither Mike Pence nor Donald Trump should be anywhere near our children’s education.”

Those words were the equivalent of throwing red meat to the wolves, as the union crowd erupted into cheers, hoots, and hollers.

Similarly, education reformers — activists, donors, lawmakers — are taking sides and reacting across social media, each about their respective outrages.

I understand how it is to feel adamant about a candidate. I have tweeted my way through a political season. But advocates for true education reform must be willing to pass judgment on policy positions before condemning policy proponents.

Such unity hardly seems possible when Clinton’s union supporters are feeding anti-school choice talking points to legions of members that their schools will disappear under a Trump-Pence administration. And Trump supporters organized in the blogosphere use different calling cards to strike a similar fear in parents, focusing on the impact a Clinton administration would have on the hearts and minds of their children, with the loss of local control and teachers unions in charge of the U.S. Department of Education.

Finding any middle path or “common” ground will be hard. And for many ed reformers, the pair of candidates presents a Hobson’s choice.

But it need not be so.Screen Shot 2016-07-20 at 5.39.04 PM

We have, as the saying goes, no permanent allies nor permanent enemies, just a never-ending interest in bettering education. Those who care passionately about education should be willing to work with anyone who is equally as passionate.

It doesn’t mean they will get your vote. But we need their ear now, and we need an open door with whoever wins. We must be willing to recognize any candidate that supports the core policies and principles of education innovation and opportunity, or call them out for their opposition, no matter who they are or what they espouse on other issues that may be near and dear to our hearts.

Why? Because history shows us that this is how we succeed.

The development of education reform is rich in strange bedfellows that locked arms in and outside of elections. People came together on policies that disrupted the status quo, recognizing that the most important issue facing our country is the education of our youth.

Wisconsin state Rep. Polly Williams was a member of the Black Panthers. She was also a partner with Conservative Republican Gov. Tommy Thompson to make vouchers a reality for poor children in Milwaukee and pave the way for greater school improvement throughout Wisconsin.

The fact that Democrats once called Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge every name in the book didn’t stop state Rep. Dwight Evans, an African-American Philadelphian who is now in line to enter Congress, from uniting with Ridge to create the state’s charter school law. Republicans fought against it to preserve local control, and Democrats fought against it to preserve the current system’s power. Sound familiar?

And in Cleveland, where the Republican Party is current perched, the late great City Councilwoman Fannie Lewis told everyone that she didn’t care who she worked with so long as they could help save her babies in her city. She joined hands with George Voinovich, a Republican governor, and free market, conservative donors to fight for school choice. And fight they did, all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

At least a dozen other such alliances have had transformational results in education in cities and states nationwide. Florida’s scholarship programs enjoy majority support in the black and Latino caucuses, even among Democrats. They partner with Republican Gov. Rick Scott, their arch-nemesis, on other issues.

Polar opposites and divisions in reform have always existed, but for years, politicians were willing to look beyond the most extreme of differences, because reformers did too.

Truly committed to education opportunity?

On the same page in support of policies and practices that produce the innovation, flexibility, and transparency to create those opportunities that hold the key to better schools for all children?

Then let’s put down our ideological swords, roll up our sleeves, and make it happen.

Let’s go back to the future. Lawmakers in statehouses nationwide and in Congress would welcome it. Policymakers and think tank researchers want it.

And our kids deserve it.

Newswire: July 19, 2016 — What Next President Needs To Know About Innovation — Charter Schools As Adult Literacy Solution — Innovation Roundtable Connects EdTech & Policy

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WHAT THE NEXT PRESIDENT NEEDS TO KNOW.  With conventions underway, we’re delivering messages from the best and brightest in education and edtech about what the next president needs to know when it comes to Innovation and Opportunity.

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EDLECTION CENTER. As a non-partisan, nonprofit organization dedicated to great opportunities for all children, students and families, CER does not endorse candidates or take political positions, but will always recognize and applaud those who advance sound education policies. See here. And here. Which is why we’re in the midst of bringing you our 2016 EDlection Center, dedicated to helping voters navigate where candidates stand on real education opportunity. In the meantime, fodder for what candidates should heed here288d3c0fbc6d496fbc519b4003c4d180

MASSACHUSETTS’ TIME TO SHINE. “For too many families, the skies have not cleared.” Bay State Governor Charlie Baker’s appropriate analogy at a rainy charter school rally last week, and why it’s Massachusetts’ time to shine when it comes to expanding opportunity.

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ADULT LITERACY. “Why aren’t innovative K-12 education models more prevalent in adult education?” ponders Liza McFadden, President and CEO of the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy. Thankfully, Goodwill is realizing the “unbridled potential” of charter schools to help solve adult literacy issues.

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INNOVATION ROUNDTABLE. Last week marked the kickoff of CER’s first formal Innovation Roundtable meeting, connecting school leaders with entrepreneurs as a way to not only beta test amazing innovations with great potential to enhance learning, but as a way to empower all involved about edtech’s intersection with education policy. To learn more, email cer@edreform.com and stay tuned to edreform.com for updates!

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