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Lessons for US and Our Children From 9/11

Everyone has a story about what was happening ten years ago, on that originally beautiful morning that soon turned into the nightmare we now know as September 11, 2001. I was watching live coverage of then President George W. Bush, who sat in a public school classroom in Florida, as he sought to mobilize people behind a consensus that our school crisis needed a major national initiative to ensure accountability for results at an unprecedented level.

After the tap on the shoulder from his chief of staff, the news people interrupted and the rest, as they say, is history. Weeks later, Bush would begin anew with the late Senator Edward Kennedy, House education chair John Boehner, house education ranking member George Miller and others as they forged a new consensus that money without strings, and without a requirement for student results, would no longer be the way our government conducted business.

As No Child Left Behind took hold over many contentious days and nights of negotiation, eventually, and in large part owing to the new found camaraderie that sprang out of the tragedy of 9/11, a new law was born.

Despite its many detractors and some flaws, NCLB then, as now, continues to shine sun on an outrage that should upset the American public at its core, on a regular basis. That outrage — that fewer than half of ALL of U.S. children are not proficient in basic, needed elements of education, and that children of color lag by another 30 percent — is something that we should approach not much differently than as if a foreign power was attacking us right here on our own soil.

In the aftermath of 9/11, we were reminded that generations of students lack a fundamental understanding of history. Evil acts aside, most Americans did not understand

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Lessons for US and Our Children From 9/11

Everyone has a story about what was happening ten years ago, on that originally beautiful morning that soon turned into the nightmare we now know as September 11, 2001. I was watching live coverage of then President George W. Bush, who sat in a public school classroom in Florida, as he sought to mobilize people behind a consensus that our school crisis needed a major national initiative to ensure accountability for results at an unprecedented level.

After the tap on the shoulder from his chief of staff, the news people interrupted and the rest, as they say, is history. Weeks later, Bush would begin anew with the late Senator Edward Kennedy, House education chair John Boehner, house education ranking member George Miller and others as they forged a new consensus that money without strings, and without a requirement for student results, would no longer be the way our government conducted business.

As No Child Left Behind took hold over many contentious days and nights of negotiation, eventually, and in large part owing to the new found camaraderie that sprang out of the tragedy of 9/11, a new law was born.

Despite its many detractors and some flaws, NCLB then, as now, continues to shine sun on an outrage that should upset the American public at its core, on a regular basis. That outrage — that fewer than half of ALL of U.S. children are not proficient in basic, needed elements of education, and that children of color lag by another 30 percent — is something that we should approach not much differently than as if a foreign power was attacking us right here on our own soil.

In the aftermath of 9/11, we were reminded that generations of students lack a fundamental understanding of history. Evil acts aside, most Americans did not understand

Read More …

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Leaders to Receive National Education Honor

CER Press Release
Washington, DC
August 3, 2011

John Boehner, Katherine Bradley, Kevin Chavous, John Fisher, Steve Klinsky, John Legend, Eva Moskowitz and Brian Williams will be honored with the distinguished EdReformie award, announced today by The Center for Education Reform (CER). These honorees will be celebrated on Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 at the W Washington D.C. Hotel as part of CER’s 18th anniversary gala, The EdReformies – Rockin’ Reform Revue.

“This group of accomplished honorees are as diverse as they are influential in bringing about much-needed change to America’s schools,” said Jeanne Allen, president of CER. “Collectively their unwavering support of expanding educational opportunities, accountability, teacher programs that work and parental choice is commendable. Individually their contributions to improving education reform through philanthropy, advocacy, media, entertainment and education are remarkable.”

Every few years the Center for Education Reform celebrates distinguished leaders for their break through contributions to creating and expanding quality educational opportunities for children. The collective accomplishments of these six individuals span almost all states and represent several million new opportunities for children. The EdReformies will be awarded to:

Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, John Boehner, a politician who has never let political pressure get in the way of ensuring children access to a better education.

As the nation’s most well-respected and influential journalist, Brian Williams has thrust the need for education reform into the homes and minds of millions of Americans.

Despite being one of the world’s most talented and popular musicians, John Legend is publically engaged in school reform, which he says is the “civil rights issue of our time.”

For over two decades, Katherine Brittain Bradley has driven reform by strategically launching efforts that focus on community engagement and volunteerism. She has created and recruited top-flight organizations to the nation’s capital and opened her home and heart to bolster education reform

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